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Some lessons learned with POR15 for rust repair.

Project cars, modifications or other general showoff

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Han_Solex

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Some lessons learned with POR15 for rust repair.

PostSun Apr 15, 2012 11:55 am

I just finished up my floorpans, which were nice and rusty thanks to a long sit in the humid northwest. I thought I'd write up my experiences using POR15 and fiberglass to fix and seal up the pans, because maybe someone can benefit from the experience I've had. Overall, I'm really happy with the result and it was fairly cheap.

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If my pans were structurally compromised this wouldn't have been an option, but they weren't too bad.

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1. They weren't joking when they say "soak the fiberglass cloth in the POR15." For parts of the pan I got a little lazy and tried a dab-in-place method (shown above) - cutting the cloth and painting POR15 onto it in place. DON'T DO THIS. If you do this, the fiberglass won't soak up enough POR15 to be really malleable for contoured areas and won't sit down very well. This stuff is surprisingly not very tacky, so I had a hell of a time getting some of it to sit down properly. I'd recommend using a shallow but wide disposable plastic container of some sort to make it easier to soak the cloth in. My yogurt cups were great for painting but lousy for soaking.

2. Get LOTS of cheap little brushes to paint it on. I ended up going through at least 10, but I also did this over 3 days rather than in one shot.

3. Try to do it all in one shot. See above.

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4. Overall, to do the majority of my pans (but not the trans tunnel), I used about 5/6th of a pint for two coats and at least 10 small fiberglass patches (biggest was 3"x4" which covered several small holes in the same area). Not too bad but a lot was wasted. Someone smart could probably do it in 1/2 pint.

5. I'd also recommend using smaller rather than larger patches. I liked the idea of larger patches that would add rigidity to the pan, but they're so much harder to work with. I'd say to try to make them 1/2" larger than the hole around the edges.

6. I also used a very coarse fiberglass weave. I'd recommend finding a very fine one. After the first coat I could still see a lot of daylight between the fibers.

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7. Lastly - how the heck do you prep hard to reach areas? My e-brake lives in a little frame rail extension that's basically a 3"x4" sunken box, and a sanding block sure as hell won't fit in there. I scratched my head for a while, and then decided to tape some sandpaper to my neoprene gloves. Worked pretty well! A flexible Dremmel extension might be easier, but this was cheaper!

If anyone has any questions about this, I'd be happy to answer. And next I'll be using it on some rust bubbles on the trunklid and near the rear wheel arches, and then hitting with primer and trying the very interesting rubber roller method (http://www.rickwrench.com/index79master.htm?http://www.rickwrench.com/50dollarpaint.html) to put some color-matched topcoat over it. I can't afford a full paintjob but I think I may have good results using this to do touch up.
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LeftofLucky

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Re: Some lessons learned with POR15 for rust repair.

PostSun Apr 15, 2012 2:46 pm

Do you have access to air tools in your work space? A die grinder and a small wire brush can make quick work of small spaces (I had a Spitfire, once upon a time).

Like this:

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Also, I've had some success buying an el-cheapo gravity fed spray gun, diluting the POR-15 with thinner and spraying it on. Of course, I didn't use fiberglass, but same notion.

I've rolled Rustoleum in the past with great success. The oil-based stuff is tough as nails so long as you don't come in contact with gas.
"Then you're trapped in your lovely nest, and the things you used to own, now they own you." ~Chuck Palahniuk
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buzzboy7

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Re: Some lessons learned with POR15 for rust repair.

PostWed Apr 18, 2012 11:49 am

I've done a lot of fiberglass work and a lot of por15ing but I never considered mixing the two. Brilliant! And the 122 looks killer. They are such cool cars.
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jeremy!

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Re: Some lessons learned with POR15 for rust repair.

PostWed Apr 18, 2012 1:15 pm

anyone use this instead?
http://www.eastwood.com/eastwood-rust-converter.html

you know.. because i got plenty of rust.
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Alff

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Re: Some lessons learned with POR15 for rust repair.

PostWed Apr 18, 2012 3:24 pm

I've used both, and been satisfied with the results. Not a scientific opinion, but I prefer POR-15 for the greasy side because it's its own topcoat.
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Han_Solex

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Re: Some lessons learned with POR15 for rust repair.

PostFri Apr 20, 2012 8:52 pm

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I should mention that I found out that apparently spray-on carpet glue can eat through POR15, so I went ahead and shelled out for the POR15 Self-Etching Primer. It's bloody expensive ($30/spray can) but I only needed one can to do my pans. After it dried, about 30 minutes, I topcoated with two coats of Rustoleum. That took about a can and a quarter to do. I feel a lot better about it so I'd recommend anyone doing this to just factor the primer and topcoat into the cost of doing the project.

It also seems like thinning and using a spray gun would be a lot more economical for both the POR15 paint and the primer, so if money's tight and you have a cheapo spray gun, I'd go that route.

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